Additional Research

AMERICAN VOTERS BELIEVE REGULATIONS HAVE INCREASED UNDER OBAMA

November 8, 2011


Resurgent Republic conducted its latest survey of 1000 American voters October 30 through November 2, 2011. Following are key highlights pertaining to regulation, spending, and taxes.



Read the full report: Voters Believe America is Worse Off Than When Obama Took Office




  1. A plurality of American voters thinks government regulations have increased since Obama took office, which is a problem because twice as many voters are more concerned that the federal government has too many than too few regulations. Forty-five percent think government regulations have increased, 42 percent think they are about the same, and only 7 percent think they have decreased. But by a two-to-one margin (59 to 30 percent), they are more concerned that "the federal government has too many regulations that make it harder to create jobs," rather than "the federal government has too few regulations to hold private businesses accountable."


  2. When presented with arguments for and against Obama's jobs bill, Republicans strongly oppose it, Democrats strongly favor it, and Independents split down the middle. The survey presented two options:


    Congressman A says that Congress needs to pass President Obama's jobs bill. This funding would keep teachers in the classroom, police and firefighters on the job, and help repair our crumbling infrastructure.


    Congressman B says that Congress should not pass President Obama's jobs bill. This is exactly like the first Obama stimulus bill that did not work; adding nearly a trillion dollars to the deficit while the unemployment rate went up.


    Republicans oppose the jobs bill 70 to 24 percent, Democrats support it 78 to 18 percent, and Independents split 45 percent for and 47 percent against.





  3. Independents side with Republicans in opposing Obama's mortgage proposal, while Democrats support it.



    Congressman A says President Obama's mortgage proposal is a good idea. We should make it easier for borrowers whose homes are worth less than their mortgages to stay in their homes, and the looming threat of foreclosures is holding back our economy.


    Congressman B says President Obama's mortgage proposal is a bad idea. Giving mortgages to people who couldn't afford them is exactly what caused the housing bubble and the financial crisis in the first place. The government should not use taxpayer dollars to help people pay for houses they can't afford.


    Republicans and Independents both think Obama's mortgage proposal is a bad idea, by 70 to 23 percent and 52 to 38 percent, respectively. Democrats think it is a good idea by 64 to 27 percent.





  4. Neither conservative response tested opposing all tax increases defeats the liberal call for a "balanced approach" that has everyone paying "their fair share." The survey phrased the call for tax increases as:



    Congressman A says that Congress needs to take a balanced approach to our debt problem by raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations. They should pay their fair share by giving up tax breaks and special deductions.


    The survey tested two options in response, with the first phrased as:


    Congressman B says this is the wrong time to raise taxes on anyone. Higher taxes mean more money going to the government, and less money in the economy that businesses can use to hire workers and create new jobs.


    With that formulation, the argument for higher taxes leads the argument against tax increases by 54 to 42 percent, including Democrats at 71 to 26 percent and Independents at 53 to 44 percent. Republicans oppose tax increases by 60 to 38 percent.

    The other response was:


    Congressman B says this is the wrong time to raise taxes on anyone. The top ten percent of earners already pay over two-thirds of all federal income taxes, while nearly half of Americans pay no federal income tax, and U.S. companies pay a thirty-five percent tax rate, more than most European countries.


    The second response does somewhat better than the first, but only marginally. With that formulation, the argument for higher taxes leads the argument against tax increases by 53 to 43 percent, with Democrats at 74 to 25 percent and Independents at 48 to 46 percent. Republicans oppose raising taxes by 59 to 38 percent.



Read the full report: Voters Believe America is Worse Off Than When Obama Took Office

Filed under: Free Market Economy, President Obama, Polling Analysis, and Obama Approval Rating