Additional Research

Las Vegas and Orlando Focus Groups (August 2009)

September 11, 2009
Assets


Resurgent Republic conducted focus groups of Hispanic voters in Las Vegas, NV, and Orlando, FL in August of 2009. The full results of the entire five pair focus group series can be found here. Following are key highlights pertaining to the focus groups in Las Vegas and Orlando among Hispanic voters:



Resurgent Republic conducted focus groups of Hispanic voters in Las Vegas, NV, and Orlando, FL in August of 2009. The full results of the entire five pair focus group series can be found here. Following are key highlights pertaining to the focus groups in Las Vegas and Orlando among Hispanic voters:



A theme that routinely surfaced during the spending discussions can be summarized as follows: people have to live on a budget, so why doesn’t government?  Younger voters understood this in terms of out of control credit card debt or how increasing debt hurts the availability of education loans. Some parents in these groups, notably among the Hispanic women, said they adjust their family budget during difficult times because they must provide for their children.





When discussing the increasing federal debt, many women voters elicited a more emotional response, almost as if they viewed the mounting debt as a physical barrier which prevents them from providing a better life for their children and grandchildren.  “I’m scared for my kids,” said one middle-aged woman in the Columbus, Ohio group.  In addition, this disappointment was magnified since they did not feel the debt barrier was built of their own doing.  In the focus groups with Hispanic women, two participants broke into tears because they believed the growing debt would limit their children’s opportunities for prosperity.





It was not new for most voters to learn that China is the single largest holder of U.S. debt, and there was a mix response, ranging from concern over the Chinese government exerting more control over our lives to belief that the Chinese government will continue to buy our debt and not call it in.  Indebtedness to China did elicit a passionate response from a Hispanic male in Nevada who summarized, “we will all be speaking Chinese” and a voter in Montana who felt that China could very well own parts of Yellowstone.  The underlying concern was that if the nation follows the projected path of skyrocketing spending and debt, the United States’ position as an economic superpower could be traded for higher taxes, inflation, and limited opportunity for future generation.



Read the full report: Independents Who Supported Obama Upset Over Direction Of Country

Filed under: Hispanic Voters, Polling Analysis, and Immigration Policy